CHILDREN LIVING IN HIGH-RISK NEIGHBORHOODS AND AFTER-SCHOOL PROGRAMS

Open Access
Author:
Robbins, Lauren Ruth
Area of Honors:
Human Development and Family Studies
Degree:
Bachelor of Science
Document Type:
Thesis
Thesis Supervisors:
  • Dr Hynes, Thesis Supervisor
  • Kathryn Bancroft Hynes, Thesis Supervisor
  • Kathryn Bancroft Hynes, Honors Advisor
  • Hobart H Cleveland Iii, Faculty Reader
Keywords:
  • Neighborhood effects
  • After-school programs
  • Children developmental outcomes
Abstract:
ABSTRACT: This study examined the effect of after school programs on the academic and behavioral development of children living in high-risk neighborhoods. . Based on prior literature about the way neighborhoods and after-school programs may influence development, I hypothesized that children would benefit academically from attending after-school programs, but that we would see no effects on their behavioral development. The data for the study came from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study Kindergarten class (ECLS-K), which was collected by the National Center for Educational Statistics (NCES). The ECLS-K provides a nationally representative sample comprised of approximately 17,000 children in the United States. This sample was then restricted to only include children who lived in high-risk neighborhoods (N=847). The ECLS-K includes child assessments as well as surveys from parents, teachers and school administrators. Results of the study indicate that compared to children who did not attend after school programs, children who did attend after-school programs, reading scores marginally decreased between kindergarten and first grade. Children’s internal behaviors were positively affected by after school programs. Regression models were used to find these marginally significant results in the study.