US ANTIDUMPING POLICIES TOWARDS CHINA: A SAFEGUARD THAT IS NOT SAFE

Open Access
Author:
Ma, Junzheng
Area of Honors:
Economics
Degree:
Bachelor of Science
Document Type:
Thesis
Thesis Supervisors:
  • Andrés Rodríguez Clare, Thesis Supervisor
  • David Shapiro, Honors Advisor
Keywords:
  • antidumping
  • China
  • trade
Abstract:
The prevailing use of antidumping measures in the U.S. has raised many concerns. Some of them include whether “antidumping practice promote, or at least maintain, a fair and competitive international market,” and whether “the U.S. benefit from using antidumping as a safeguard tool” The first part of this paper examines the drawbacks of U.S. antidumping measures by integrating a series of studies and examples. Studies have shown that antidumping has been practiced in order to benefit import-competing industries, rather than upholding a fair and competitive market. In fact, antidumping has resulted in only minor gains for domestic producers, but huge losses for domestic consumers. The second half of the paper studies U.S. antidumping laws and policies associated with China, U.S.’ number one trade partner. Studies in the past have shown that the U.S. has significantly overused antidumping practice against China, and thus resulted in duties imposed on China to be much higher than those imposed on other countries. China’s ongoing transition into market economy and the important trade relations between the U.S. and China suggest that the U.S. need to reconsider its antidumping practice towards China; such practice offer little benefit to the U.S. This paper concludes that free trade is beneficial and suggests countries to be mindful of building trade barriers, such as antidumping duties.