THE ROLE OF ANALYTIC THINKING AND MORALITY IN PERCEPTIONS OF SEXUAL CONSENT

Open Access
Author:
Conway, Kayla Brooke
Area of Honors:
Interdisciplinary in Criminology and Psychology
Degree:
Bachelor of Arts
Document Type:
Thesis
Thesis Supervisors:
  • Andrew Peck, Thesis Supervisor
  • Kenneth Levy, Honors Advisor
  • Stacy Silver, Honors Advisor
  • Jeffrey Todd Ulmer, Faculty Reader
Keywords:
  • sexual assault
  • morality
  • MFT
  • cognitive load
  • analytic thinking
  • sexual consent
  • sexual misconduct interventions
Abstract:
Sexual misconduct is a serious concern on college campuses. Overall, intervention efforts have proven unsuccessful (Bachar & Koss, 2001; Blackwell, Lynn, Vanderhoff & Gidycz, 2003; Breitenbecher, 2000; Ullman, 2003) and some scholars attribute this to a lack of theoretical basis (Morrison, Hardison, Mathew & O’Neil, 2004; Testa & Livingston, 2009). Drawing on theories from psychology and criminology, this project uses a multi-disciplinary approach to consider the relationship between moral foundations, cognitive abilities, and perceptions of sexual consent. Specifically, the interest lies in examining how individual differences in morality and cognitive ability influence perceptions of consent among college students. Overall, results showed weak but significant relationships between moral foundations and perceptions of consent. The role of cognitive abilities in this relationship, implications, and future directions are discussed.