HEAT TRANSFER AND PNEUMATIC EFFECTS OF PARTICLE-LADEN FLOW THROUGH CURVED PIPES

Open Access
Author:
Bradley, Connor P
Area of Honors:
Mechanical Engineering
Degree:
Bachelor of Science
Document Type:
Thesis
Thesis Supervisors:
  • Michael P Manahan Jr., Thesis Supervisor
  • Jacqueline Antonia O'Connor, Honors Advisor
Keywords:
  • Heat Transfer
  • Particle-Laden Flow
  • Curved
  • Heat Exchanger
  • Entrainment
  • Nusselt
  • Reynolds
  • Pneumatics
  • Mechanical Engineering
Abstract:
The purpose of this thesis is to understand the effect of pipe curvature on heat transfer in particle-laden flow. Extensive research has been conducted on fluid flow with particle entrainment, providing a strong foundation for understanding the parallel between theoretical models and experimental results. The thesis begins by providing insight into previous research to exhibit the reasoning of conducting this new research. Then, it discusses the experimental methods used to entrain particles in a gaseous flow through a heat exchanger and the procedures to gather data from this system. In these experimental tests, nitrogen gas is flowed through halfinch diameter stainless steel piping and entrained with copper powder. Heat tape is used to heat the test sections and provide a constant heat flux boundary condition for heat transfer. Analysis of the experimental data showed trends that curvature increased the Nusselt number by up to 300% in some cases compared to the equivalent straight-pipe experiment. Further, for a curved heat exchanger, the heat transfer was higher along the outer curve of the pipe compared the inner curve, likely due to secondary flow effects. Finally, the presence of the particles in gaseous flow increased the heat transfer in the system compared to gas-only flow, as evidenced by the decreased temperature differences between the wall temperatures and the bulk flow temperatures. The present research suggests significant heat transfer benefits are possible with curved-pipe, particle-laden flows.